Search Standards & Resources   |   GaDOE Website
 
With the exception to the GSO Videos, this website is no longer updated and may contain outdated information. Please visit the new GSO website at http://www.georgiastandards.org.

To view the Georgia Classroom Instructional Videos, the following plug-ins need to be installed on your computer; Flash and Java.

Internet Explorer 8 users need to go to the Tools menu and select "Compatibility View".
GPS WEBSITE FINDER
Professional Learning
GLC Lesson Plan Builder (Unit Design Builder)
Partners in Education
GSO to GO

CONTACT INFORMATION
For General Information:
GSO Content
1952 Twin Towers East
205 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE
Atlanta, GA 30334
 (404) 463-1280
 (404) 657-5183
  bcaracci@doe.k12.ga.us

Pam Smith (Standards)
Director of Academic Standards & Instructional Services
1766 Twin Towers East
205 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE
Atlanta, GA 30334
 (404) 463-1929
  pamsmith@doe.k12.ga.us

  Math Staff Contacts

  GSO Staff Contacts

Help Desk
(Technical Assistance)
 (800) 869-1011

Report Problems with this Page
Is it Fair?

Cherie Long
8th grade
Ola Middle School
Henry County Schools

Contents

Task
Overview
In this task, students will play the game “Is It Fair?” in groups and record their information. Students will then use probability to determine whether they feel the game is fair or not. Predictions should be made before the game begins. Based on their trials, students will then determine all outcomes and create tree diagrams. Finally, students will determine the theoretical chance of winning for each player.

Illustrative Task

Game 1

Directions: Put a red-red and a red-yellow chip in a cup. Take turns shaking and tossing the chips. Player A scores a point if both chips land with the red side up. Player B gets a point if one of each color lands up. The first player with ten points wins the game.


Player A gets 1 point.

Player B gets 1 point.

Is this game fair? Why? Make a prediction before you play. Play the game at least 5 times (i.e., tossing the chips until one of the players has 10 points) and record your results. Calculate the relative frequency of each player’s winning. On the basis of these trials, do you think the game is fair? Analyze the game by listing all possible outcomes or drawing a tree diagram. What is the theoretical chance of winning for each player?

Game 2

Directions: Now add another red-red chip to the cup. In this game, if all three chips show red, Player A scores a point; otherwise, Player B scores a point.


Player A gets 1 point.

Player B gets 1 point.

Is this game fair? Discuss with your group before you play. Play the game, and record and study the results. What is each player’s chance of winning? Suppose a red-red and two red-yellow chips are used. How does this change the outcomes? Is the game fair?

Game 3

Directions: Suppose that a red-red chip is replaced by a second red-yellow chip. Again, if all three chips show red, Player A scores a point; otherwise, Player B scores a point. How does replacing one of the red-red chips with a second red-yellow chip change the outcomes? Is Game 3 fair?

Game 4

Directions: Try this game with three chips—red-blue, red-yellow, and blue-yellow. Player A scores if all three chips are different colors; Player B scores a point if two chips match.


Player A gets 1 point.

Player B gets 1 point.

Predict the fairness of this game. Discuss your reasons before playing. Play and record at least five games. Find the relative frequency of each player’s winning to decide if the game appears to be fair. How many outcomes are possible for this game? Make a tree diagram to help find the theoretical probability for each player. If this game is not fair, how would you change the scoring to make it fair?

GPS Addressed
M8D2. Students will determine the number of outcomes related to a given even.
    a. Use tree diagrams to find the number of outcomes
    b. Apply the addition and multiplication principles of counting.
M8D3. Students will use the basic laws of probability.
    a. Find the probability of simple independent events.
    b. Find the probability of compound independent events.

Video Information
Use these questions to guide your thinking about some of the important teacher ideas in the lesson featured in the video clip.
  1. What kinds of questions does the teacher ask to promote students’ problem solving?
  2. How is the teacher gauging students’ current understandings and building from those understandings?
  3. Consider the GPS standards listed with this video.
  4. What makes this lesson different from lessons you have taught on this topic?

Classroom Materials

Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use   |   Site Requirements   |   Feedback Copyright © 2005-2006 Georgia Department of Education
mathframework